Anonymous asked:

Hi, I am currently a junior in highschool and considering a nursing career. I want to do a job shadow at my local hospital in the summer. I was wondering if you had any recommended materials for me to read or anything that I should know before going to the job shadow. Thanks :)

Hey there!

That’s a great idea, shadowing in the medical field. It’s a nice way to open your eyes and your mind to this profession and to see if it’s something you’d want to work for.

I can’t think of anything you need to specifically do to prepare. It may be good to have questions ready to ask the nurses you see. Once you think of some from now until you start, write them down! That way you can get the information you want and not forget to ask. I’d say before you start, have a good night’s sleep, eat a great breakfast and keep an open mind. That way you’re alert to everything happening around you and you can absorb it all.
Good luck in your shadowing and hopefully we’ll recruit you into our world!

Anonymous asked:

I am almost done with all my pre-reqs for Nursing school, but now I have developed a passion for nutrition/alternative medicine. Is there any RN job that I could use to two together?

Hey there!
I’m not exactly sure if there are specific nursing positions that you can use both. I know that personally I do teach my patients nutrition related to their diagnosis or past medical history (heart healthy, diabetic, renal, etc) as a medical-surgical nurse. I’m sure that you could do something similar to what I do and use your passion for nutrition. There may also be other outlets that you can follow both your dreams such as in hospitals or community programs.

Followers, any other advice?

Anonymous asked:

Is it a bad sign if you have to take anatomy twice? Does that mean I'm not smart enough for nursing?

I don’t think so. Some classes are just harder for some then they are for others. I know a lot of people who didn’t do well in anatomy and did well in other classes. Personally, I sucked at chemistry (a core class for my program) but survived other nursing classes. Anatomy is a lot of memorizing. Nursing classes are application. If you think you can apply what you learn then you’ll do okay. Keep your head up, study hard. Remember, you should have all the essential qualifications for a nurse before nursing school anyway (compassion, caring, kindness, etc). Good luck!!

Anonymous asked:

In your opinion, which is the hardest nursing class?

The hardest class for me was when I started med surg. The reason is I believe that class is the core of nursing. Up until that point in school, I just prepped and had background knowledge to help me in med surg. I struggled at first with the way of thinking and application but then got the hang of it. :)
The second hardest class for me was pediatrics. I love kids but who knew how involved little people were! The difficulty here was me memorizing all the differences between their normal vitals, labs, when they needed vaccines, etc. After surviving med surg and memorizing those normals, it got a little tricky to not confuse the age groups in my mind.
Good luck in your classes!

Message

I accidentally deleted a message instead of posting it. It was in regards to someone not knowing if they should transfer schools or stay where they were. To anyone in this predicament my advice is:

speak to an advisor at a school of interest. They would be helpful in steering you in the right direction and will hopefully align your goals with a path of education that you can take.

The second is to write a list of pros and cons from the school you’re enrolled in versus the school you want to transfer to. That will give you a concrete list to help organize your thoughts and decide what part to choose.

Lastly, there was a point in why it was hard to get into a community college. My answer would be that they are local and affordable, which most people would agree are great factors in higher education. The downfall of community colleges are that classrooms are smaller, there are less professors to teach and clinicals are smaller, meaning they can’t accept as many students as universities can, making their waiting list very long.

I don’t have very much experience or knowledge in transfers, so any members that know more please help! Thanks.